Mr Gay SA: 12 Heroes, 1 Dream

VANESSA SMEETS

This time next week, the new Mr Gay South Africa will be crowned at Emperor’s Palace in Johannesburg. In a country that still struggles with sexual identity and where homophobia is still quite prevalent (we read about ‘gay beatings, murders’  and corrective rape on a weekly basis), I asked one of the finalists to share his aspirations, thoughts and comments on the whole experience.

Craig Maggs (25) and I met five years ago, after the whole “Stellenbosch Kissing Saga.” When I met him the first time, he was using another name and afraid to come out. All I could see was a survivor. He has not only survived homophobia, but also a crocodile attack that crushed his dream of becoming a surgeon (Craig lost an index finger in the attack). Today, he stands as an icon of solidarity; hopeful and watchful of a new South Africa that aims to not only accept every race, but also every sexual preference. From chef to personal trainer to writer, who knows where this talented young man will go…

Craig_friendly

IRON MAN: Body of steel, heart of gold. Craig hopes to change the gay community by creating a platform where socials can include fitness and fighting for similar causes. PIC: supplied

QUICK FACTS:

Height: 1.87m
Weight: 90kg
Favourite food: Mum’s lasagna or Portuguese chicken
Favourite quote: “With a single blow of a hammer, you have transferred plans into action.”
Biggest accomplishment: Surviving a crocodile attack at Lake Kariba and learning to accept myself as I am.
Greatest dream/ desires: My greatest desire is to live a life that will be remembered.
Strengths: Compassionate. Resilient. Dependable.
Weaknesses: Terrible liar, I over think things, I don’t trust easily.
Occupation: I work two jobs: I work for an NGO that deals with AIDS and Ebola research during the day and at night I am a waiter at Beefcakes in Illovo (who got me involved in this competition).
Hobbies: Playing sport, keeping fit, gardening, hiking, baking and sleeping.

Craig, you have trained hard to be in the Top 12. The last time I saw you, you were on a broccoli and asparagus diet, trying to reach your target weight and body.
But, tell us, what do wish to accomplish in terms of the competition?
My faith has challenged me to make a stand in order to make a difference to those that are hurting out there, especially those who I can relate to. The lonely, the oppressed, the bullied, the raped and those who have lost their ability to dream. I want to walk alongside them in their journey as a role model and friend. I want to be the reason someone never gave up on life or themselves.

Craig_smile

BEHIND BLUE EYES: Behind his charming smile, lies a BSc degree in Sports Science from Stellenbosch University. Pic: supplied

So, how did you prepare for Mr Gay SA?
Besides going to the gym and a horrible diet (of mostly green veggies), I wanted to broaden my mind. I approached different people and discussed their views on matters. It was incredible to see how differently we see things. I also did a lot of research into the history of gay rights, focusing on icons and how they altered history.

The Top 12 are incredibly diverse, from all over the country. How would you describe the other contestants?
The 12 contestants are incredibly inspiring people. All from different walks of life (from medical to political backgrounds), making us a dynamic team with different approaches and focus points. We have nicknamed ourselves the super 12 with the goal of changing the world around us.

Hmmm… How does Mr Gay SA stand apart from other “beauty” competitions?
Not only do we represent minority groups, we also focus on creating 12 role models, not just one. All twelve people will have a role to play throughout the year not just the winner.

What is your advice to those who wish to compete?
Approach this competition with an open mind and an open heart. It will challenge you and make you grow in ways you never thought possible. But, also be aware that this competition will open your eyes to a very broken world, that may cause you to become depressed if you have the wrong motives. Do it to make this world a better place not for selfish goals. Challenge the norms and be courageous role models to society.

What has been the biggest challenge in this competition?
For me personally the biggest challenge has been the emotional load of seeing so much hurt and need, especially because I can’t do enough to change it.

…And the greatest joy?
The greatest joy would be the message I received from a Zimbabwean friend living in Australia. She told me how she was so impressed on the impact I was making and that I should keep going, no matter how difficult it was.

How has your family and friends reacted to you being part of it?
My family were very concerned, if not disappointed, but have been amazing considering their background. As for my friends, they have been incredibly supportive and have really motivated and carried me all the way!

TOP 12: The finalists had fun and were also trained and mentored by Mr Gay World 2013, Christopher Olwage. PIC: Facebook

TOP 12: The finalists had fun and were also trained and mentored by Mr Gay World 2013, Christopher Olwage (far right). PIC: Facebook

What is your response to the negative feedback on Mamba Online page about you guys?
At first I was shocked and horrified at what people wrote, but now I see it as a challenge. A challenge to prove that this group of 12 heroes is there to be role models for all groups, not just racial or homosexual. We are a team and not individuals.

Now for the competition-type questions…

What is your view on being religious and homosexual? So many people battle and how do they overcome it?
Personally I am a Christian. Jesus said in the Bible: “WHOEVER believes in me shall have eternal life.” (John 5: 24) It doesn’t say “only some people” or “only straight people.” That is what I hold onto.

It is not an easy journey, as often the people of the church are the ones who cause the most hurt for gay people. They tend to ostracize you, judge you or try to change you. But don’t give up faith.

GAY PRIDE: The Top 12 inspired thousands in Cape Town to walk the streets with them, for a better South Africa. PIC: Facebook

GAY PRIDE: The Top 12 inspired thousands in Cape Town to walk the streets with them, for a better South Africa. PIC: Facebook

What do you think SA can do more in terms of LGBTI rights?
South Africa is fortunate to have one of the best constitutions for LGBTI rights in the world. However, it could do a lot more in protecting the people from the homophobia experienced by people in the community. Also, I believe South Africa could also stand up for LGBT rights throughout Africa, like in Uganda and Zimbabwe.

How can we do more in terms of these African neighbours and homophobia?
This is a very delicate issue, because this could make conditions worse for the affected people in those countries. However, we do need to do something! There are too many human rights violations happening to do nothing. Usually, the best way to change situations like this is to change the minds of the young, while they are still open and accepting. Make them question the norms and they will create the positive change. It will take a few brave individuals risking a lot, but a worthwhile cause cannot be left alone.

How can we educate the community more on:

  • corrective rape
  • homophobia
  • LGBTI NGOs
  • “gay media”

I think a good place to start is to build relationships between the LGBTI community and the mainstream media. Yes, often people complain about the involvement of “pink news” but in our day and age, it is becoming more prevalent. This could be highly beneficial to both integration of the LGBTI community, as well as people being able to share their stories that are big issues in society today. For example, corrective rape and homophobia. The first step to solving a problem, is admitting that it exists and raising awareness of it.

This will take concerted effort from the LGBTI community, which needs to work as a team and not individuals.

Craig_gay pride

WALK THE WALK: Craig and the other contestants showed off their ideas and bodies at Gay Pride in Cape Town last month. PIC: supplied

How do plan on using the title if you win?
I have two ideas I would like to develop:
Firstly, the buddy system. Let young LGBTI people interact with people who can serve as role models. Have a small group forum, where they can learn through other peoples experiences.

Secondly, I would like to reintroduce the gay sports’ night where people can interact across age and racial barriers, in a relaxed fun environment. My focus would be raising young leaders and again having the young learn from people with experience.

Anything you’d like to add?
I really think that it’s time the LGBTI community starts to work together towards a common goal, rather than defeat its own purposes.

 

Stalked by HIV: The Human Indifference Virus

domestic violence

ABUSE: At the Gay Pride Parade in March, the gay community recognised the strong link between domestic violence at home because of oppressive parents. PIC: Vanessa Smeets

VANESSA SMEETS

Maybe it’s his red shoes or blond curls that make Andy stand out. When he sits down, I realize it’s rather the subtle scar slashed across his ice-blue eyes.

“Anything but gay?” he says with a smile.

His voice is soothing and pleasant to the ear. It can’t be described as feminine or masculine, but rather as something in between. He peers across my notes.

“I haven’t said anything yet and you’re writing away!” he says with an attractive grin that has one hooked immediately.

Family tides

The awkward silence between us is short-lived. He takes out his phone and proudly shows his photos. He continues to chat as though we’ve been life-long friends.

“That’s my mom, Dawn. She’s beautiful, isn’t she? She’s so proud of me. I’ve never pretended to be someone else. That’s my dad – he disowned me for a while. Called me a faggot, moffie, man-whore – you name it. He doesn’t treat me in the same way as my two brothers. Probably blames himself; he wasn’t around when I grew up.”

He’s silent while looking for a few moments at the blurred photo of a man in kaki attire, rifle in hand. He’s a hunter, perhaps. He quickly moves on to the next one.

“That’s my ouma, she’s the only one who doesn’t know I prefer guys. It’ll kill her.”

I ask him about the scar but he’d rather speak of something else – like joining Tuks’ (the University of Pretoria) first gay society. Surprisingly, they don’t get hate mail or threatening smses. Instead, they get messages like “Jesus loves you. You’ll burn in hell if you don’t change. Give Jesus a chance.”

 

pink revolution

PINK REVOLUTION: The University of Pretoria went through some extreme changes in 2006, when its first gay society was born. PIC: Vanessa Smeets

Varsity blues

The only people who hassled them were a couple of guys in the SRC (Student Representative Council), which caused some controversy in 2006. They declared the society ‘non-existent’ even after more than 100 members joined. They painted twice over the freedom of speech wall, trying to stop what Andy calls the ‘Pink Revolution’ from going anywhere. But they didn’t succeed – the society keeps on growing, embracing gays, lesbians, bisexuals and straight people with their funky ideas and late-night parties.

After three hours of coffee, muffins and laughing, Andy decides to tell about his scar.

“My brothers did it to me when I was thirteen. They caught me cutting up pictures of Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt and pinning them against my wall. They forced me to tear them down. I didn’t. I couldn’t. It felt right.”

He pauses for a few moments then continues, his hands shaking, “The night of my Standard 5 Valediction, they spotted the pictures under my bed and threw me against the wall. My parents were waiting in the car. After that, I blacked out. I woke up in hospital bruised, in pain and alone.

The nurse said my family would come by later. They didn’t. My mom came by two days later. I pretended to be asleep. She kissed my cheek and sobbed her eyes out. When I looked up at her, I saw her sunglasses hiding a horrible blue eye. Dad had beaten her up for protecting me. We moved away together; the rest of them couldn’t accept my sexuality. I didn’t want to hurt her anymore, so I brought girlfriends home. She knew I was faking. Now, we laugh together – ‘he’s cute and him.’ It’s liberating.”

What makes people “gay”?

Andy found out he was different when he enjoyed playing excessively with his cousin’s Barbie dolls and fell in love with his tennis coach in Standard 3. Today, the mystery into what makes people gay is still being researched. Swidey (2006: 40) explains that some scientists believe it to be half the amount of neurons found in the anterior hypothalamus of homosexuals compared to heterosexuals. After Dean Hamer’s discovery in 1993, some believe it could be a ‘gay gene’: the X chromosome, Xq28, is more frequent in gay men. Some still believe it to be biological causes, such as the increase of hormones in certain foods.  In 2005, Swedish researchers claimed the cause could be the different pheromones that gay men are attracted to. Like straight women, they are found to be attracted to male sweat rather than female urine. Whatever the case, Andy explains he never chose his sexual orientation.

Apart from the red shoes and strange voice, he looks like an ordinary guy. With a cigarette dangling from his manicured hands, he explains how he’s been labelled with stereotypes all his life.

“Yeah, so pink isn’t my favourite colour and I don’t wear two litres of after-shave. I’ve had my share of heart-breaks, just like any other guy. I’ve been sent for therapy. I’ve experimented with drugs and alcohol. I’ve been tested for AIDS, I’m negative. Basically, I’m just like any other student. People have stopped looking at me as that not-so-gay-guy.”

Andy removes his jersey. More scars are visible now – tiny red marks swim around on the inside of his wrist. I cannot help but stare.

great divide

GREAT DIVIDE: In South Africa, there is still a strong divide between the gay community and Christians, as the Pride Parade demonstrated. PIC: Vanessa Smeets

“People are too busy to notice,” he says, “It’s not for attention though, it’s for myself. To remind me what I’ve been through. Each scar marks a closure of some sort. That’s the day my dad told me to go to hell. That’s the day my so-called friends from school locked me in a closet and yelled ‘stay there, you freak!’ This one’s the deepest – it was the last one – the night I decided to die. I woke up, luckily. I realized then I was born for something incredible. This gay society (UP and Out) has given me a purpose. It’s not HIV but the Human Indifference Virus that almost killed me.”

After shaking my hand firmly, he smiles and begins to walk away. A ray of light laps up his blond curls while he finishes speaking.

He reaches for a gold chain in his pocket and says:

“God has taught me to love myself beyond what this world thinks. They may say I’ll burn in hell for being gay, but I’ll burn forever in this hell by trying to be someone else.”

*based on a true person, some facts have been edited to suit the article’s purpose

Sources:

Swidey, N. 2006. What makes people gay? In Fairlady, March 2006, Issue 830. Cape Town: Media 24.

Don’t be a drag, just be a queen

VANESSA SMEETS

Rhino times

SAVE US: "Save the rhinos" with the motto 'Let me be horny' had the most colourful float. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

Lady Gaga’s new song “Born this Way” hit South Africa just in time for its 16th Gay Pride Parade in Cape Town on March 5, which celebrated ‘Love our Diversity ‘ and became an anthem in the scorching heat, blazing loudly from several floats.

Spectators could also hear the chanting of “We’re queer and we’re here” as the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) pride flag adorned the city in red, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet.

Stellenbosch University’s Lesbigay opted for fairies and mythical creatures with the slogan “We exist,” blowing bubbles into the crowd. They shared the float with a few Cape Townian friends and decorated it in plastic ivy, sunflowers and pink and green balloons.

Lesbigay float

LET'S BE GAY: Lesbigay's colourful attire as mythical creatures made their second Pride Parade unforgettable. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

“Next year, we hope to have our own float. Thirty members supported us this year, compared to the handful last year. It was absolutely magical,” said Ellen Wang, Lesbigay’s marketer and treasurer.

Other floats included a “Save the Rhinos” float with the slogan Let me be horny, a Beefcakes float decorated by pink flamingos, a bubble bath party, Cape Town Lesbians float decorated by women in lingerie, Crew’s float adorned with men in army briefs and the public dressed in colourful and original gear on foot.

Pride Parade CT

OUT AND ABOUT: The Pride Parade in Cape Town took a new route this year, leaving some members a little worried about their safety. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

Pride started this year at the end of February with the Pride Film Premiere, the Red Party (to promote HIV awareness), a massive pool party and finally the parade which made its way up Beach Road, along the Cape Town stadium, through Sea Point’s Main Road and ended with an anti-climax afterparty at the stadium. Lack of music and ambiance influenced the majority to hit Clifton’s Third Beach and later end up at the Pink Strip’s clubs.

Fallen queen

FALLEN QUEEN: DJuze Nipples before her tragic fall. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

“Lots of people were also bothered by this year’s new route, which made us more visible than last year. They felt more at ease in the old route,” said Roberto Millan, Lesbigay’s ex-chair. Dylan van Vuuren, Rainbow UCT’s former chair agrees: “The route could have been better organised and the R30 entrance at the afterparty was far too much. There wasn’t even a proper MC.”

Amongst the sea of rainbow flags, feather boas, fishnet stockings and men in drag, people holding placards shouted into the crowd: “Jesus can save you from homosexuality!” and “Jesus can save you from the lake of fire!” They blasted sirens into the crowd, which were dumbed down by the floats hooting to a maximum as they passed by.

Muslim pride

THE GREAT DIVIDE: Religion was a strong topic in this year's Gay Pride Parade. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

Ironically, in the song Gaga sings, “It doesn’t matter if you love him or Him,” a direct reference to God, which permeated the entire parade, as a few floats opted to include religion as part of their theme. A group of Muslims were dressed in Middle-Eastern gear of silk saris and kaftans on their float, with a huge banner that read : “Created in the image of Allah. Muslim. Lesbian. Do you see the resemblance?”

The Good Hope Metropolitan Community Church decorated their float with a huge cross covered in the colours of the Pride flag, with two children holding up the official South African rainbow flag above the banner: “Would Jesus discriminate?” The ‘official’ South African Gay Flag was launched at last year’s MCQP party.

Beefcakes float

BEEF IT UP: The Beefcakes float claimed to have 'the best buns in town' and were a stern crowd favourite. PHOTO: Vanessa Smeets

The parade was interrupted half way when a drag queen “DJuze Nipples,” who was part of the Beefcakes float, fell off from the top of the truck as she moved to sing. Suffering from concussion, bruises and a cut leg, she was rushed to hospital in a brace and stretcher.

The Pride flag has been listed as the world’s largest flag by The Guinness Book of World Records. It was created in 1978 by American artist Gilbert Baker, who claimed to be influenced by Judy Garland singing ‘Over the rainbow.’

What the Pride flag colours mean :

Red : life
Orange : Healing
Yellow : sunlight
Green : nature
Turquoise : magic/ art
Blue : serenity/ harmony
Violet : spirit

Some flags have re-adopted the hot pink above the red, which represents sexuality.

EXTRA SOURCES : Eyewitness News, IOL, wikipedia.org, official Pride website

Maties’ “gay kiss” goes viral

gay lovers

UCT students participate in the fun of Stellenbosch’s annual kissing festival. The publication of the image has caused an outcry amongst conservative groups. PHOTO: VANESSA SMEETS (copyrighted)

In memory of a wonderful friend and inspiration, Bjorn Czepan. Bjorn died in a car accident three weeks after the kiss made headlines. He will also be remembered for his work with the poor and trying to make a change in South Africa.

VANESSA SMEETS, photo editor Die Matie

When Die Matie, Stellenbosch’s respected campus newspaper, decided to go ahead and publish my photo of two men kissing at its annual kissing festival “Soen in Die Laan,” we knew it would ruffle a few conservative feathers. We, however, did not anticipate such a national response.

In 2008, Stellenbosch beat a record of 7000 people participating in an hour of passionate kissing. Although Lesbigay, Stellenbosch’s lesbian, gay and bisexual society, is ten years old, it is the first time they participated. Gay societies from other universities were invited as well.

The two men in the picture are actually UCT students, but the picture was chosen as the front page for two reasons. Firstly, it was a sincere kiss captured in the moment . They didn’t seem uncomfortable and didn’t even realise I was there. Also, there are straight couples noticeable in the background, which added great context. Afterwards, I asked them if I could use it and both agreed it was a sincere kiss, not dirty in any way. Secondly, it showed that Lesbigay participated for the first time and even managed to get other gay societies to join.

“The response has been phenomenal,” says Robbie Millan, the chairperson of Lesbigay. His inbox has been left with messages of congratulations, motivation (“I want to be like you”) and even confessions by in-closet students of feeling proud and crying tears of joy. Because homophobia has been rearing its ugly head since the publication of the picture, Lesbigay has trying to get more involved with its members and hopes to open a counselling centre for gay students by the end of the year.

It is my first week as the new photo editor and my first front page. Now, there is a par to maintain, which I’m a little anxious about. We never  intended the picture to be sensational or become tabloid-like, as some people have accused us of. But, what a rippling effect it has caused… Even OFM news in the Free State wrote a piece on it. It made its way to page 3 of Die Rapport last Sunday, then landed on Nuus24.com, Eye Witness News and iAfrica.com.

The phone hasn’t stopped ringing by journalists from newspapers and radio stations intrigued by the hype, the reactions and the future of Die Matie. It’s been really interesting to see how they interpret the whole situation. While some have done a clumsy job in news-writing (getting facts and names wrong, adding juicy details to quotes), others have gone the extra mile of getting even a response from the university. The university has stated in Die Burger (18 August, page 3) that it supports all races and sexual identities and does not condone discriminatory behaviour.

Listen to my MFM (Matie FM) interview:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPb7q5eniIE

I love being a journalist, especially when you know your photos and writing make a difference. I worked three years as an in-depth reporter at Perdeby, University of Pretoria’s campus newspaper, which is where I learnt that even a little controversy in a student newspaper can finally make people read it.

I once wrote a piece on casual sex amongst students, which had a great response from students and lecturers. The same can be said about this picture. While I would’ve preferred them using a picture from two Matie students (who happened to be white and coloured) in a passionate embrace, our editor decided “baby steps.” The reaction on a homosexual couple and, on top of that, inter-racial would have caused even more of an outcry.

Students reactions have been so diverse. While some have been congratulating us for “courage, change and endeavour,” others have been accusing us of boycotting the beauty behind the festival and being “fag hags”. I found many issues of the paper scribbled with hate speech, mutilated or torn to shreds. Some even went as far as changing one of the kissers into a woman. Others have used the paper as dart boards or teasing their friends and house-mates by writing their names above the kissers. Some took dozens of papers to show their friends or to throw them away.  By the end of the afternoon, no issues were left lying around. It is our best response to an issue in four years.

It feels like there’s a revolution taking place on campus… Change is good and keeps society healthy.

Lesbigay claims that next year they will try to get a much bigger group and prove they have as much a right as straight people to show their affections in public. Let’s hope by that time, Stellenbosch’s students would have accepted all human rights. After all, it’s a time of sexual freedom in an age where our freedom of expression has been targeted more frequently. Rise up, South Africa, and realise we fought hard to get this far… What a frightening ideal for some.

Here is a list of all the links:

Die Rapport:
Spoeg spat op Maties
http://www.rapport.co.za/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Spoeg-spat-op-Maties-20100814

News24.com:
Maties gons oor mansvryers in kampuskoerant. http://www.nuus24.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Maties-gons-oor-mansvryers-in-kampuskoerant-20100815

Eye Witness News:
University newspaper’s front-page kiss gets tongues wagging. http://www.ewn.co.za/articleprog.aspx?id=46488

OFM News:
Die Matie voorbladfoto veroorsaak opskudding.
http://www.ofm.co.za/news.asp?nid=11125

iAfrica.com: Gay kiss photo furore: http://news.iafrica.com/sa/2593980.htm

Homophobia still present: http://www.2oceansvibe.com/2010/08/17/stellenbosch-guffaws-at-predictably-scandalous-uct-students/

iol.co.za: Tongues wagging after Stellenbosch kiss: http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=13&art_id=vn20100817045312587C979279&set_id=

Cape Camp Culture: Gay kiss makes front page of Die Matie – Stellies newspaper: http://cape-camp-culture.blogspot.com/2010/08/gay-kiss-makes-front-page-of-die-matie.html

Mambagirl.com: Furore over Stellenbosch kiss: http://www.mambagirl.com/article.asp?artid=4752

Towleroad.com: Gay blog… http://www.towleroad.com/2010/08/gay-kiss-photo-stirs-outrage-sales-for-south-african-student-paper.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+towleroad%2Ffeed+(Towleroad+Daily++%23gay+news)

College Media Matters: Gay Kiss Photo in South African Student Newspaper Sparks Anger, Praise: http://collegemediamatters.com/2010/08/17/gay-kiss-photo-in-south-african-student-newspaper-sparks-anger-praise/

Media update: Varsity newspaper front page sparks debate: http://www.mediaupdate.co.za/?idstory=29071

Gay kiss photo stirs outrage, sales for  South African student newspaper: http://www.topix.com/za/stellenbosch/2010/08/gay-kiss-photo-stirs-outrage-sales-for-south-african-student-paper

Topix.com: What happens when a South African student newspaper lets gays kiss on the front page: http://www.queerty.com/what-happens-when-a-south-african-student-newspaper-lets-gays-kiss-on-the-front-page-20100816/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+queerty2+%28Queerty%29

Skadi Forum Germanic Online Community: “Gay kiss” photo furore: http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?s=2fabf69f51b752335ce3fb0dba7c7b67&p=1021199#post1021199

My radio interview:  Interview with John Maytham: http://www.capetalk.co.za

JOHN MAYTHAM 17 August 2010 3:15 PM
Gay kiss sparks controversy on campus
The new issue of ‘Die Matie’ shows two men kissing during the annual ‘Soen in die Laan’ (Kiss in the Avenue) event at Stellenbosch University. It seems to have sparked a huge debate on campus, with some conservative students slamming it, while others have praised it. Copies of the newspaper were even defaced and slashed as some students what they perceive as the ‘impropriety’ of the image. Reaction on social media sites, Facebook and Twitter has been large. Vanessa Smeets took the photo and it was a joined editorial decision to have it published in the university newspaper.
Guest: Vanessa Smeets
Organisation: Die Matie newspaper
Position: Photo editor